SYMC

The Message Of Gurumayi For 2017

Updated: Mar 08, 2022

The Message Of Gurumayi for 2017 made a big impact in Siddha Yoga Path worldwide. Malti Shetty was born on June 24, 1955, in Bombay, India. She was the eldest child of a restaurateur and his wife.

The Message Of Gurumayi 2017 made a big impact in Siddha Yoga Path worldwide.

Malti Shetty was born on June 24, 1955, in Bombay, India. She was the eldest child of a restaurateur and his wife. Swami Muktananda (1908–1982), whose Sanskrit name translates as "the bliss of liberation," was granted permission the following year to establish an ashram in Ganeshpuri, near Bombay (Mumbai), and to teach under the supervision of his guru, Bhagavan Nityananda ("the venerable one who is eternally joyful").Swami Muktananda, a charismatic teacher, coined the term "Siddha Yoga" and established weekend programs for the transmission of spiritual energy from guru to disciple, shaktipat or shaktipat-diksha (shaktipat initiation), a format that differed from the traditional full-time residence model of guru-disciple and allowed for the participation of diverse devotees in ashram events. Shetty's parents converted to Buddhism and began bringing her, her sister, and two brothers to the ashram on weekends in 1960.

Where Is Gurumayi Chidvilasananda Now?

Gurumayi Chidvilasananda (or Swami Chidvilasananda), born Malti Shetty on June 24, 1955, is the current guru or spiritual head of the Siddha Yoga path, which has ashrams in Ganeshpuri, India, and the Western world, with the SYDA foundation's headquarters in South Fallsburg, New York.

Who Succeeded Muktananda?

In May 1982, Muktananda appointed two successors as joint leaders of Siddha Yoga: Swami Chidvilasananda and her younger brother, Swami Nityananda. Later, Nityananda resigned and founded his own group. Muktananda departed this life in October 1982.

Gurumayi's Message For 2017

"Breathe in deeply the fragrance of the Heart.

Revel in the light of the Supreme Self.

Breathe out gently the benevolent power of the Heart."

The Bottom Line

The organization understands Swami Muktananda's Siddha Yoga teachings to have deep roots in Hindu theology. For centuries, Indian religions have used the term "siddha" to refer to a "perfected being," and it is frequently associated with secret teachings. The Tamil tradition of South India recognizes a distant lineage of siddhas (siddhars) who are distinguished by their attainment of immortality and healing powers (Weiss 2009). Bhagavan Nityananda (1900–1961), the founder of Siddha Yoga, is remembered as a great yogi with miraculous healing powers who did not require ceremonial events because he could transmit shaktipat to a deserving disciple through the light of his gaze. Swami Muktananda's interpretation of the term "siddha," based in part on formulations in the classical Hindu philosophical treatises, the Upanishads, emphasized the power of meditation to effect the realization of the human spirit's identity with the divine.